Support

Telephone Support Line 0800 092 7640

Available Monday to Friday 9.00am-5.00pm

Telephone Support Line 0800 092 7640

Available Monday to Friday 9.00am-5.00pm

Telephone Support Line 0800 092 7640

Available Monday to Friday 9.00am-5.00pm

You may wish to fundraise yourself, with family and friends or within your local group. Whatever the idea, be it large or small, we know you will have a great time raising vital funds for Big C.

Did you know we have 12 charity shops across Norfolk including a dedicated Craft Supplies Shop, Furniture Emporium, Bridal and a high-end fashion Boutique? We are always looking for high quality donations.

Volunteer

We are always looking for volunteers including in our Support Centres, shops and at our Fundraising events. Volunteering is a great way to spend some free time, meet new people, and gain experience.

Help us build a new Cancer Support Centre in Norwich. Support our vision to bring greater cancer care nearer to home. Donate now.

Exploiting imaging mass spectrometry to investigate excision margins in melanoma: a pilot study

Exploiting imaging mass spectrometry to investigate excision margins in melanoma: a pilot study

2016 Research Grant Award

£42,543 for 12 months starting 1 Dec 2016 at the School of Biological Sciences, UEA and Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.

Grant Applicants:

Dr Jelena Gavrilovic; Senior Lecturer (Cell Biology)

Mr Marc Moncrieff; Consultant Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon (NNUH)

Melanoma is a type of cancer that most commonly develops in the pigmented cells in the skin, often associated with following UV exposure from sunlight. It is the fifth most common cancer in the UK and effects a much younger population than other types of cancer. Treatment for melanoma involves the removal of the primary tumour in order to stop it spreading to other parts of the body.

Because this type of cancer is usually pigmented it is possible to see its outline on the surface of the skin. As with any cancer it is essential that all cancerous cells are removed so, in addition to the pigmented cells an area of “normal” tissue surrounding the melanoma is also removed. It is important to take all the cancer away but it is uncertain how much of the “normal” tissue needs to be removed and procedures differ widely across the world. Removing a lot of the surrounding tissue can lead to less desirable consequences including pain and disfigurement, depending on the location of the melanoma.

The Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital is leading a big clinical trial (in the Norwich and around the world) to try to establish how much skin from around the melanoma needs to be removed to prevent recurrence of the cancer.  The tissue that is removed around the melanoma is studied under a microscope by hospital pathologists to make sure no cancerous cells are left but as we understand more about cancer we know that molecules in the tissue, which are invisible under the microscope, are also important in helping cancer spread and recur.

We will be using a new and very sensitive method to look for the presence of pro-cancerous molecules in the tissue surrounding the melanoma.  We will be looking in regions 1cm and 2cm away from the melanoma to see if we can identify the smallest amount of tissue that can be removed to stop the cancer returning. We may also be able to use the new findings to plan other ways to treat melanomas which have started to spread round the body.

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Find out how Big C can support you and your family if you’ve been affected by cancer.

We can help to improve your quality of life, physical health, and mental wellbeing.

Some people take to the skies, run, jump, walk, swim and cycle whilst others make tea, bake cakes or shave heads.

What will you do to make a difference?

Two men from Norfolk who found themselves with cancer and having to travel for treatment, vowed local people would have access to the best treatment and support … and in 1980 the Big C Appeal was formed.