Support

Telephone Support Line 0800 092 7640

Available Monday to Friday 9.00am-5.00pm

Telephone Support Line 0800 092 7640

Available Monday to Friday 9.00am-5.00pm

Telephone Support Line 0800 092 7640

Available Monday to Friday 9.00am-5.00pm

You may wish to fundraise yourself, with family and friends or within your local group. Whatever the idea, be it large or small, we know you will have a great time raising vital funds for Big C.

Did you know we have 12 charity shops across Norfolk including a dedicated Craft Supplies Shop, Furniture Emporium, Bridal and a high-end fashion Boutique? We are always looking for high quality donations.

Volunteer

We are always looking for volunteers including in our Support Centres, shops and at our Fundraising events. Volunteering is a great way to spend some free time, meet new people, and gain experience.

Help us build a new Cancer Support Centre in Norwich. Support our vision to bring greater cancer care nearer to home. Donate now.

Development of a multi flor-omic platform to functionally interrogate the calcium signalling pathway in colorectal tumours: implications for cancer prevention and chemotherapy

Development of a multi flor-omic platform to functionally interrogate the calcium signalling pathway in colorectal tumours: implications for cancer prevention and chemotherapy

2016 Research Grant Award

£82,802 for 12 months starting 1 July 2017 at the School of Biological Sciences, UEA.

Grant Applicants:

Dr Mark Williams; Senior Lecturer

Dr Iain Macaulay; Group Leader

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world; each year over 41,000 people are diagnosed in the UK (1 person every 15 mins), leading to approximately 16,000 deaths per annum. Notwithstanding clinical screening programmes and complementary advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatment, just over half of these individuals live for more than 10 years (Cancer Research UK).

In recent years, significant progress has been made in understanding the origins of colon cancer and the processes that control its growth. It has also become clear that the genetic make-up of colon cancer can differ between individuals which helps explain why chemotherapy is not ‘one size fits all’.

This project will use state-of-the-art techniques to grow colorectal tumours in the laboratory so as to understand how the genetic make-up of each tumour confers the massive growth and survival potential that are the hallmarks of cancer.  Armed with this information, it is hoped that new chemotherapies can be developed that are tailored to the individual.

An exciting new collaboration has been formed between a gastrointestinal physiologist (Mark Williams, UEA) and a genome biologist (Iain Macaulay, Earlham Institute). Essentially, this powerful combination of expertise will be able to detect defects in the genes of colon cancer cells and comprehend how this translates into tumour formation and growth. Recent observations suggest that calcium signals, which act like Morse code, are corrupted in genetically altered cancer cells and end up sending evil messages to grow, invade and disrupt surrounding normal tissues in the intestine and beyond.  A major aim of this project is to crack the ‘calcium code for colon cancer’ and subvert these sinister signals by intercepting them with novel drugs that will make these hostile cells more susceptible to chemotherapy.

Take me to a different section...

Find out how Big C can support you and your family if you’ve been affected by cancer.

We can help to improve your quality of life, physical health, and mental wellbeing.

Some people take to the skies, run, jump, walk, swim and cycle whilst others make tea, bake cakes or shave heads.

What will you do to make a difference?

Two men from Norfolk who found themselves with cancer and having to travel for treatment, vowed local people would have access to the best treatment and support … and in 1980 the Big C Appeal was formed.